Give content URLs!

I hate one page websites. I'd rather click than scroll. Give content URLs, people! Don't make me view source to find anchors.

PHP Deployment Tools

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Viral Headline Template #1

"... You won't believe what happened next!"

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Yay! Applinks! Lets "use" the web to kill the web y'all!

Applinks misses the point and shows a failure to recognize the real problem with native apps

Made my Dribble debut today: https://dribbble.com/shots/1523266

Commented on a post by Aaron Parecki.

I made a point of not including any third-person text about the things I publish there. I'm not going to say "Aaron liked a post on..." for example

See First-person narrative

Liked a post by Kyle Mahan.

This post strikes me as right on. When I started coding for my site, I implemented comments the way you might for any old web programming tutorial. I’d receive a mention, parse out the content, and stick it in a database table. This never felt quite right — I’m using this awesome, innovative indieweb federation stuff as just a fancy comment-entry-form. And maybe that’s ok for a first step (or maybe not), but there’s more here!

Also on the other side of the coin, this makes me want to put more thought and effort into my replies, so they’re actually befitting a post of their own.

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Commented on a post by Aaron Parecki.

@sandeepshetty This reply doesn't have a title, so would you render it just as a URL to this page?

Yep, and maybe even treat it as a second-class reply.

Fuck Comments

On the rare occasions that I log into Facebook and Twitter these days, I just see people talking past each other. There is something about the format of asynchronous short comments/replies that doesn't lend itself well to constructive conversations. If you've been on the web long enough and remember the time when the only way to reply to a blog post was to write a well thought out blog post on your own blog, you might appreciate how that was better for the parties involved in the conversation and it's readers.

With the indieweb and how it uses webmention, we again have a way to turn comments into first-class content and I'm thinking making replies look like comments might be a bad idea. We should take what's unique about our approach and use it to our advantage. Combined with likes, we have a much better framework for constructive conversations and feedback.

I especially like how Tumblr didn't allow comments and how that community turned out. We can do even better.

When I get around to it, I'm going to change how I display replies by removing the text of the reply but keep everything else, especially the title of the reply. This is similar to how Trackbacks were displayed.

What do you think? What didn't you like about how Trackback were displayed? How can we make it better?

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